Book of the Month: November 2016

I’ve had quite a variety of reads this month, though quite a few have been average reads for one reason or another. This of course did make it easier to pick my book of the month which goes to…

Henry Wade’s Mist on the Saltings (1933)

Image result for mist on the saltings

The main feature of this book, which pushed it ahead of the other reads this month was its characterisation and how Wade develops characters as the story progresses, with reader sympathies shifting and evolving a lot. Although Wade uses familiar plot lines his rendition of them is highly enjoyable, grabbing your attention with a love triangle that has a decidedly sinister end. Mystery novels which focus on character development, culminating in a murder half way through the novel can sometimes have problems with pace, but Wade’s novel is certainly not one of them. Out of the three Wade novels I have read (The Verdict of Us All (1926) and Lonely Magdalen (1940)) this is definitely my favourite with Wade’s wide range of writing skills being displayed effectively.

However there were a few close (ish) runner ups, which I have decided this month to put into a “What to Read Next” flowchart (also proving that I am not so computer illiterate as I thought I was):

reading-flow-chart2

 

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About armchairreviewer

Qualified English teacher, with a passion for literature and crime fiction. On a random note I also own pygmy goats and chickens with afros (it doesn't get any cooler than that).
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4 Responses to Book of the Month: November 2016

  1. Brad says:

    How DO you make those charts, Kate? I’m impressed!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I used https://www.draw.io/ to construct the chart and then I used print screen and paint and then word to transfer the chart into a useable image format. There will probably be a much smarter way to do this last bit but for unfathomable reasons they weren’t working for me. Due to the fiddly nature of it I would recommend not making too complicated a chart as if you make the chart too wide you’ll struggle to fit into a blog post etc. Best to be longer rather than wider. There are quite a lot of additional features on that website to make your flow chart more fancy but I decided to quit while I was ahead and not over reach myself. Glad you like this one though. Makes a change for my Book of the Month post.

      Like

  2. Great chart…and I will have to look for that Michael Underwood book as I liked the one of his that I have read very much

    Liked by 1 person

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