CADS 85: A Look Inside

It was wonderful to receive in the post this week the latest issue of CADS (Crime and Detective Stories) magazine. As usual it is hard to decide which piece to read first, as there are a number of items which grab my attention:

  • Dorothy L. Sayers’s Debut: Whose Body? by Philip L. Scowcroft
  • Crime Fiction and the Grand-Guignol: Natural Bedfellows by Michael Wilson
  • Wild Animals and Snakes in Crime Fiction by Scowcroft
  • Cooking Seton’s Goose (or Ten Little Murderers) by John Goddard
  • More on Crime Fiction from the 1930s: Weymouth/Punshon/Wynne Armstrong/Sprigg by Scowcroft
  • Hunting The Cornish Fox by Martin Edwards
  • The Smarter Older Brother, a.k.a. The British Government: Mycroft Holmes by Liz Gilbey
  • Ten Favourite… by Jamie Sturgeon

Fans of Inspector French will also be pleased to know that this issue contains an edited and revised version of the article on Crofts that appeared in Mystery and Suspense Writers (1998), edited by Robin W. Winks. My own contributions were a piece entitled: What Did Golden Age Detective Fiction Ever Do for Us? A Legacy… and a flow chart to help you decide which of last year’s reprints you should read next.

CADS magazine can be posted around the world and if it sounds like it might be your sort of thing I recommend emailing the editor Geoff Bradley to find out more.

Editor’s Email Address: geoffcads@aol.com

P.S. I promise this is my last blog post today! Four is quite enough, even if it does not reach Brad’s optimistic idea that I blog 6 times a day!

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