Just the Facts Ma’am (2018): Reading Challenge Complete

First post of the day, my End of Year review will be following shortly (I promise I have actually written it!), but for now as part of Bev’s Just the Facts Ma’am reading challenge, I need to do a final wrap up post to show all of the titles I read for the challenge.

To find out more about the challenge click here.

This year I completed all of the categories for the Gold and Silver card, which I was quite pleased about. Thankfully there were too many hair pulling moments, trying to find books to fit each category.

So whilst I appreciate this is not the most scintillating of post topics, it might be of interest for those considering taking the challenge next year (still lots of time left to sign up for it), or for those looking for a new read around a particular topic (e.g. locked room, academic mystery etc.). Each book is attached to its own review so you can see what I made of them. At the end of each group I’ve picked out some of my favourites as well.

Gold

Who

An Academic: Beginning with a Bash (1937) by Alice Tilton

Crime Solving Duo: Narrow Gauge to Murder (1952) by Carolyn Thomas

An Amateur Detective: Cut Throat (1932) by Christopher Bush

In the Medical Field: Bones in the Barrow (1953) by Josephine Bell

A Journalist/Writer: Smile and Murder  (1954) by Francis Symonds

An Artist/Photographer: Third Party Risk  (1953) by Nicolas Bentley

Retired from or in the Armed Services: The Polferry Riddle  (1931) by Philip Macdonald

Matriarch/Patriarch of Family: The Deadly Dowager   (1934) by Edwin Greenwood

Favourites from this group: Beginning with a Bash and The Deadly Dowager.

 

Where

At a Country House: Murder at Fenwold  (1930) by Christopher Bush

On a Mode of Transportation: Black Express  (1945) by Constance and Gwenyth Little

On an Island: The Case of the 7 Sneezes  (1942) by Anthony Boucher

At a School: Murder in the Basement  (1932) by Anthony Berkeley

Set in a small Village: A Murder is Announced  (1950) by Agatha Christie

In a hospital/nursing home: The Deadly Climate  (1955) by Ursula Curtiss

Features a courtroom scene: The Bellamy Trial  (1927) by Francis Noyes

In a Locked Room: The Case of the Gilded Fly  (1944) by Edmund Crispin

Favourites from this group: Pretty much all of these were winners, except the Noyes book which was pretty dire.

 

What

Pseudonymous Author: The Beacon Hill Murders  (1930) by Roger Scarlett

Number in the Title: The Case of the Four Friends  (1956) by J. C. Masterman

Colour in the Title: The Black Rustle  (1943) by Constance and Gwenyth Little

An Animal in the Title: Bats in the Belfry  (1937) by E. C. R. Lorac

Means of Murder in the Title: A Dram of a Poison  (1956) by Charlotte Armstrong

Reference to a Man or Woman in the Title: Dead Men Don’t Ski  (1959) by Patricia Moyes

Book Published Under More Than One Title: The Pavilion/ The Deadly Pavilion  (1946) by Hilda Lawrence

Title that Contains Two Words Beginning with Same Letter: The Back Bay Murders  (1930) by Roger Scarlett

Favourites from this Group: Another strong bunch, especially enjoying the books by Masterman, the Littles, Armstrong and Moyes.

 

How

Death By Drowning: A Shilling for Candles  (1936) by Josephine Tey

Crime Involved Fire/Arson: Fire in the Thatch  (1946) by E. C. R. Lorac

Death By Poison: Deadly Nightshade  (1940) by Elizabeth Daly

Death By Strangulation: The Problem of the Wire Cage  (1939) by John Dickson Carr

Death by Knife/Dagger etc.: The Millionaire Mystery  (1901) by Fergus Humes

Death By Shooting: Ben on the Job  (1952) by J. Jefferson Farjeon

At Least Two Deaths With Different Means: Neck and Neck  (1951) by Leo Bruce

Death By Blunt Instrument: Death Knocks Three Times  (1949) by Anthony Gilbert

Favourites from this Group: Neck and Neck and Death Knocks Three Times.

 

When

During A Recognised Holiday: The Right Murder  (1941) by Craig Rice

A Historical Crime: Ordeal by Innocence  (1958) by Agatha Christie

Time/Date/Etc. in Title: Night of the Jabberwock  (1950) by Frederic Brown

Timing of Crime is Crucial: The Case of the April Fools  (1933) by Christopher Bush

During a Weather Event: Murder on the Tropic  (1936) by Todd Downing

During a Trip/Vacation/Cruise etc.: The Puzzle of The Happy Hooligan (1941) by Stuart Palmer

During a Performance of any sort: The Problem of the Green Capsule  (1939) by John Dickson Carr

During a special event: Birthday, Village Fete etc.: The May Week Murders  (1937) by Douglas G Browne

Favourites from this Group: The Right Murder, Ordeal by Innocence, Night of the Jabberwock and The Puzzle of the Happy Hooligan.

 

Why

It won an award of any sort: Beat Not the Bones  (1952) by Charlotte Jay

It made a “best of” list: Death Watch  (1935) by John Dickson Carr

Has been read/reviewed by a fellow challenger at any time: The Nine Dark Hours  (1941) by Lenore Glen Offord (Philly Reader was the fellow challenger)

Has been on your TBR list: For Old Crime’s Sake (1959) by Delano Ames

Out of Your Comfort Zone: Blood and Judgement  (1959) by Michael Gilbert

An Author You’ve Never Tried: The Westminster Mystery  (1930) by Elaine Hamilton

It’s by an author you’ve read and loved before: The Left Leg  (1940) by Alice Tilton

Book Made into TV/Film/Play: Mr Bowling Buys a Newspaper  (1943) by Donald Henderson

Favourites from this Group: Books by Offord, Ames, Tilton and Henderson

 

SILVER CARD

Who

An Academic: Paul Temple and the Kelby Affair  (1970) by Francis Durbridge

Crime Solving Duo: From Information Received  (1962) by E. and M. A. Radford

An Amateur Detective: Alias For Death (1950) by Barbara Leonard Reynolds

In the Medical Field: A Talent for Murder  (1942) by Anna Mary Wells

A Journalist/Writer: The Case of the Monday Murders  (1936) by Christopher Bush

An Artist/Photographer: Murder Isn’t Easy  (1936) by Richard Hull

Retired from or in the Armed Services: Murder M D (1943) by Miles Burton

Matriarch/Patriarch of Family: Vanish in an Instant by Margaret Millar

Favourites from this Group: My absolute favourites were Murder Isn’t Easy and A Talent for Murder.

 

Where

At a Country House: Weekend at Thrackley (1934) by Alan Melville

On a Mode of Transportation: Murder of my Aunt (1934) by Richard Hull

On an Island: This is the House  (1945) by Shelley Smith

At a School: Cat Among the Pigeons  (1959) by Agatha Christie

Set in a small Village: Death of a Favourite Girl  (1980) by Michael Gilbert

In a hospital/nursing home: Man Missing  (1953) by M. G. Eberhart

Features a courtroom scene: Tread Softly  (1937) by Brian Flynn

In a Locked Room: Till Death Do Us Part by John Dickson Carr

Favourite from this Group: No hesitation it has to be Till Death Do Us Part.

 

What

Pseudonymous Author: The Adventures of Dagobert  (1889-1910) Trostler by Balduin Groller

Number in the Title: Lady in a Million  (1943) by Susannah Shane

Colour in the Title: The Black Shroud  (1941) by Constance and Gwenyth Little

An Animal in the Title: The Hound of the Baskervilles  (1902) by Arthur Conan Doyle

Means of Murder in the Title: Poison in Jest  (1932) by John Dickson Carr

Reference to a Man or Woman in the Title: The Man in the Cellar  (1907) by Palle Rosenkrantz

Book Published Under More Than One Title: London Particular  (1952) by Christianna Brand

Title that Contains Two Words Beginning with Same Letter: French Farce  (1937) by Edwin Greenwood

Favourites from this Group: The Black Shroud (unsurprisingly) and London Particular.

 

How

Death By Drowning: The Sunken Sailor  (1961) by Patricia Moyes

Crime Involved Fire/Arson: Burnt Offering  (1955) by Francis and Richard Lockridge

Death By Poison: The Case of the Crumpled Knave (1939) by Anthony Boucher

Death By Strangulation: Murder Underground  (1934) by Mavis Doriel Hay

Death by Knife/Dagger etc.: Sailor Take Warning  (1944) by Kelley Roos

Death By Shooting: Death is No Sportsman  (1938) by Cyril Hare

At Least Two Deaths With Different Means: Plain Murder  (1930) by C. S. Forester

Death By Blunt Instrument: A Question of Time  (1971) by Helen McCloy

Favourites from this Group: The Sunken Sailor, The Case of the Crumpled Knave and Plain Murder.

 

When

During A Recognised Holiday: Murder Rents a Room  (1943) by Sarah Elizabeth Mason

A Historical Crime: A Stranger in my Grave  (1960) by Margaret Millar

Time/Date/Etc. in Title: ‘Murder on the 7.16’ –  in Blood on the Tracks  (2018; 1956) ed. by Martin Edwards

Timing of Crime is Crucial: ‘Calling James Braithwaite’ – in Bodies from the Library (2018; 1940), ed. by Tony Medawar

During a Weather Event: Devil’s Caress  (1952) by June Wright

During a Trip/Vacation/Cruise etc.: He Found Himself Murdered  (1947) by Delano Ames

During a Performance of any sort: The Arsenal Stadium Mystery  (1939) by Leonard Gribble

During a special event: Birthday, Village Fete etc.: The Division Bell Mystery  (1932) by Ellen Wilkinson

Favourites from this Group: Devil’s Caress and The Arsenal Stadium Mystery

 

Why

It won an award of any sort: The Colour of Murder (1957) by Julian Symons

It made a “best of” list: The Whispering Wall  (1969) by Patricia Carlon (Found in Sue Feder’s Favourite 50 in The Essential Mystery Lists: For Readers, Collectors and Librarians ed. Roger Sobin)

Has been read/reviewed by a fellow challenger at any time: Murder Gone Mad (1931) by Philip Macdonald (Read by fellow challenger JJ)

Has been on your TBR list: The Asking Price (1966) by Henry Cecil

Out of Your Comfort Zone: The Missing Bronte  (1983) by Robert Barnard

An Author You’ve Never Tried: Now I Lay Me Down to Die  (1955) by Elizabeth Tebbetts-Taylor

It’s by an author you’ve read and loved before: The Ledger is Kept  (1953) by Raymond Postgate

Book Made into TV/Film/Play: Incident at the Corner (1957) by Charlotte Armstrong (Produced by Alfred Hitchcock in 1960)

Favourites from this Group: The Colour of Murder, The Whispering Wall, Incident at the Corner and The Asking Price

2 comments

  1. Well done, Kate! I’m just shy of filling my gold card and nowhere near completing the silver. Lots of great titles on you list. Can’t wait to see what you read next year.

    Liked by 1 person

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