14 Responses to Sent to his Account (1954) by Eilís Dillon

  1. JJ says:

    Don’t worry, we’re too bookish a bunch to get involved in personal flame wars — all negativity was directed (deservedly, I feel…ahem) at Ms. Dillon. Brad is not franctically deleting a Facebook group as you read this…

    I’m curious about the detachment between the investigation and the solution, as you put it, but I realise that would veer alarmingly over spoiler lines. The notion reminds me of abook I reads that I want to like a lot more than I think I do, in which it’s very clear the majority of the book is going to have no bearing on the final outcome of the crime. It’s an…unusual experience, I’ll grant you, and one I’m not sure I’d be eager to read again!

    RIght, onwards: what shall we disagree about next?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hmm not sure who to disagree on next. I was thinking about all the writers we have disagreed on in the past and I kept going oh and yes that other one and yes that one also. But it is your turn to pick the author.
      It is hard to describe the detachment without giving spoilers but its annoying as the solution is really good, but it is just not really integrated enough into the previous text, which is focused on other avenues of investigation shall we say. The lack of physical clues in this book makes the detachment more significant as it isn’t a case of the detective finally interpreting the clues the right way, as there aren’t really any clues to interpret, apart from a few human behaviours.

      Like

      • JJ says:

        Sounds like a very interesting idea, but it would have to be done very well in order to work (much like the old “clue from a thing that isn’t there”). Aaah, well, have been bitten by Dillon once, now have to abide by the whole ‘twice shy’ rule and edge cautiously around her when she approaches.

        As for who’s next…well, I have Juanita Sheridan’s The Chinese Chop still to read, or I thought I might have anoher go at Edmund Crispin’s Frequent Hearses, or Christianna Brand’s Death of Jezebel…dunno, really. A bit caught up with Ye Olde Book of Locked Room Conundrums at present, so reading is kinda slipping down my priorities. Oh, well, shall have to surprise you with something 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Never read Death of Jezebel. Been ages since I have read a Brand novel to be fair, so I’d be interested in finding out about DOJ. When do you think your YOBOLRC will be ready?

        Like

      • JJ says:

        YOBoLRC is prorgressing well…got 10.5 of the 15 stores sorted, need to type up one more, get another one edited…and then I hit a bit of a wall, as I have the texts of the remaining two but can’t get them into easily usable and/or editable form. So I don’t know what to do about those…gonna hope something occurs to me while getting these others sorted out.

        The plan was to get it out before the end of August, and that remains the plan. Whether tha plan has any basis in reality remains to be seen!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Wow you’re getting on fast! Hope you sort out your formatting issues. Would love to be able to suggest a solution but IT is not one of my fortes.

        Like

  2. curtis evans says:

    Ever since you started reviewing these Dillon books, I’ve been trying to remember the one I read in the 1990s but I just can’t remember it. I’m going to have to see whether I can find it. It’s unusual when I just don’t recall anything about the book. I think I liked it fairly well, just can’t remember any detail!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Brad says:

    I don’t know why I’m just getting round to reading this, but I’m trapped in a boutique with my mom and my niece as they shop for clothes, so I’m grateful to have this distraction! I don’t think I have as negative an opinion about Dillon as you imagine, Kate. I felt the same way about the detection aspect of Crane’s Court as you do here, but it sounds like this one has some good characterization. I’m trying not to read your review of Quadrangle before I read the book. Do you like that one more than this?

    Liked by 1 person

    • haha oh dear, are you the official bag carrier or something? Book shopping is much more fun than clothes shopping. I think my main issue with this book was that the investigation didn’t marry with the solution as much as it needed to. Consequently that possibly makes the detecting front in DITQ look better. However in some ways I think I got more attached to the characters in this book, in particular Miles. But on the other hand I think DITQ is funnier and more comic. So in short I don’t know which I prefer!

      Like

  4. Pingback: ‘Tasteless and immoral’: the #1954book results | Past Offences: Classic crime, thrillers and mystery book reviews

  5. Pingback: Country House Mysteries – Some of my favourites | crossexaminingcrime

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s